The Camouflage Beneath Band Camp

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The Camouflage Beneath Band Camp

Emma Golz is dedicated to band and plays her flute with passion.

Emma Golz is dedicated to band and plays her flute with passion.

Lauren Johnson

Emma Golz is dedicated to band and plays her flute with passion.

Lauren Johnson

Lauren Johnson

Emma Golz is dedicated to band and plays her flute with passion.

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Everyone has heard of band camp, but do you know what happens inside of band camp? Band camp takes place late July for a two-week session. It then continues into the beginning of the school year, making it the start of marching band season.
Whether it ranges from strictness to entertainment, band camp is a mixture of emotions.
“My favorite memories are marching to music in the rain, along with all the laughter and fun we have,” said Morgan Geithman (‘21).
With this, band is more exciting from what it looks like to the outside. This is the beginning for upcoming freshmen, to show what they are capable of in band. “I am thinking of it as a time to practice for marching band when I will be able to play on drumline and try pitt a little. I also think it will be fun for exercises, to grow as a percussionist,” said Joshua Thurman (‘23). Of course, you have to put your heart into band in order to show what you are capable of.
Band camp has a lot of expectations, and either upcoming freshmen know what it is or do
not. Upcoming freshmen Mary Elliott knows what will happen in band camp. “I’m expecting it to
be mostly an outside camp where we practice marching, play new music, and know how to play
while marching,” said Elliott (‘23).
Even though it has clues in the title, some still do not know. There are also the fears of band camp. “I fear that I won’t excel at my instrument as I want to. My second fear is that I’ll get a heat stroke or something related to that,” said Samantha Crouch (‘23). Heat is considered the main fear of every grade in high school, though other students have different fears.
Those outside of band camp do not know what happens inside. There is a day required for all upcoming ninth graders. That day is when you learn the very basics of marching, along with marching commands. Believe it or not, the band directors will point you out if you laugh at attention.
What happens after that? The first week of band camp. The morning consists of stretches, breathing techniques, and other related activities. As the day continues, you start to either teach or relearn your marching skills, while color guard learns their work.
The second week is surely the most brutal week for everyone. It consists of the stuff from the first week and the possibility of getting drill. Although it has more emotional breakdowns and passouts than the first week. It also remains as the week everyone is looking forward to.
Drill down, and the Kona Ice truck. The things that make everyone happy. Being in band might seem intense, but band is such a passionate enjoyable experience. There are those students joke about being in band, Rachel Merrell for example. “Bring water. Run away while you still can,” said Merrell (‘22) laughing.
Beneath this, students actually enjoy being in band. The competitions are what make band enjoyable, but there are also the possibilities of not getting the prize you want. “The rides to competitions are memorable. You get to hang out with your friends on the bus, which is really fun if you get a good group,” said Joey Williams (‘19).
Of course making band friends is important, but you are also there to learn music. Whether you are considering joining band, marching band is just the beginning. You have to go through marching band in order to go into band. This means going through stress, competitions, and your emotions.
Inspiring words for upcoming freshmen:
“Just stick with it because after band camp during competitions and football games you will
create your best memories of high school.” – Kane Calvillo (‘19).
“Fight through band camp because the rest of the marching season is where the real fun begins.”
– Joseph Keck (‘20).
“No matter how painful, hot or hard it is, you can push through. Though don’t push yourself too
hard, its okay to take a break if you need to. Stick with it and push through band camp, because
the feeling you get after a successful performance, completing the drill, and even getting done
with band camp, is amazing. You will not regret going through this fun hell.” – Tim Zoll (‘21).
“Listen to the band directors, bring a ton of water, don’t give up because you will regret it and
wear deoderant.” – Emma Golz (‘22).